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Southeast Region Parks


Bahia Honda State Park
36850 Overseas Hwy.
Big Pine Key, FL
305-872-2353

Welcome to Bahia Honda State Park
Henry Flagler’s railroad to Key West turned the remote island of Bahia Honda Key into a tropical destination. Today, the island is home to one of Florida’s southernmost state parks, known for beautiful beaches, magnificent sunsets, and excellent snorkeling. Visitors can picnic on the beach and take a swim, or simply relax and enjoy the balmy sea breezes that caress the shores year-round. Anglers can fish from shore or bring a boat and launch at the boat ramp. The park’s concession rents kayaks and snorkeling gear and offers boat trips to the reef for snorkeling excursions. Bahia Honda is an excellent place to see wading birds and shorebirds. The nature center can introduce nature lovers to the island’s unique plants and animals. Full-facility campsites and vacation cabins are available. Located 12 miles south of Marathon.

Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park
1200 S. Crandon Blvd.
Key Biscayne, FL
305-361-5811

Welcome to Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park
Cape Florida is the home of a historic lighthouse built in 1825 and reconstructed in 1846, the oldest standing structure in Miami-Dade County. Visitors come to the park to sunbathe, swim, and picnic on over a mile of sandy Atlantic beach front. Biking and kayaking are also popular activities. Anglers can throw in their lines from the seawall along Biscayne Bay for some of the best shoreline fishing in the region. Guided tours of the lighthouse and lighthouse keepers cottage are given twice daily, Thursdays through Mondays. The Boaters Grill offers casual waterfront dining, or picnickers can reserve a pavilion and grill their own dinner. Bicycles, beach chairs, and umbrellas are available for rental. Overnight boat camping is allowed in No Name Harbor, and a primitive campsite is available for organized youth groups. Located at the southern end of Key Biscayne off the Rickenbacker Causeway, south of downtown Miami.

Fort Pierce Inlet State Park
905 Shorewinds Drive
Fort Pierce, FL
772-468-3985

Welcome to Fort Pierce Inlet State Park
The shores and coastal waters at this park provide an abundance of recreational opportunities. The breathtakingly beautiful half-mile beach welcomes visitors for swimming, snorkeling, surfing, and scuba diving. Beachcombing, picnicking, or just relaxing on the sand are also popular activities. Dynamite Point was once the training site for WWII Navy Frogmen, but is now a haven for birdwatchers. Along the south end of the park, Fort Pierce Inlet is a popular place for anglers to catch their dinners. Jack Island Preserve, located one mile north of the park, has trails for hiking, bicycling, and nature study. At the west end of the Marsh Rabbit Run Trail, visitors can climb an observation tower to get a bird’s-eye view of Indian River and the island. A primitive youth/group campground is available on a reservation basis; please call the park. Located four miles east of Fort Pierce, via North Causeway.

Indian Key Historic State Park
P.O. Box 1052
Islamorada, FL
305-664-2540

Welcome to Indian Key Historic State Park
In 1836, Indian Key became the first county seat for Dade County. At that time, this tiny island was the site of a lucrative business-salvaging cargo from shipwrecks in the Florida Keys. Accessible only by private boat or charter boat, visitors come here to swim, sunbathe, and hike. Canoeing, kayaking, boating, and fishing are also popular activities. The perimeter of the island provides one of the few near-shore areas for snorkelers and scuba divers to see coral. Ranger-guided tours are offered twice daily, Thursday through Monday. Tour boat services, as well as boat and kayak rentals, are available from Robbie’s Marina. For tour reservations call (305) 664-9814. Located on the ocean side of U.S. 1 at Mile Marker 78.5.

John D. MacArthur Beach State Park
10900 S.R. 703 (A1A)
North Palm Beach, FL
561-624-6950

Welcome to John D. MacArthur Beach State Park
In the 1970s, businessman John D. MacArthur donated the land for this park to preserve a subtropical coastal habitat, much of which had already been lost to urban sprawl. A unique mixture of coastal and tropical hammock and mangrove forest, this barrier island provides a haven for several rare or endangered native tropical and coastal plant species. The park’s nature center shows visitors why the park is a biological treasure. Visitors can swim, picnic, and surf at the beach; scuba diving and snorkeling are also popular activities. Birdwatchers can see herons, brown pelicans, terns, sandpipers, and gulls. Anglers can fish in the lagoon by wading, kayaking, or canoeing, they can also fish from non-swimming areas of the beach. Located in northern Palm Beach County, 2.8 miles south of the intersection of U.S. 1 and PGA Boulevard on A1A.

John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park
P.O. Box 487
Key Largo, FL
305-451-1202

Welcome to John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park
The first underwater park in the U.S., John Pennekamp encompasses approximately 70 nautical square miles. While the mangrove swamps and tropical hammocks in the parks upland areas offer visitors a unique experience, it is the coral reefs and their associated marine life that bring most visitors to the park. Most enjoy the view from a glass bottom boat tour, but visitors can get a closer look by scuba diving or snorkeling through the reefs. Canoeing and kayaking through the parks waters are popular activities; fishing is permitted in designated areas. Visitors can enjoy hiking two short trails, or picnicking and swimming at the beach. The visitor center has a 30,000-gallon saltwater aquarium and theater showing nature videos. Full-facility and youth/group campgrounds are available. For boat tour information and reservations, call (305) 451-6300. Located at Mile Marker 102.5 in Key Largo.

John U. Lloyd Beach State Park
6503 N. Ocean Drive
Dania, FL
954-923-2833

Welcome to John U. Lloyd Beach State Park
Perfect for a day at the beach or a family picnic, this park provides an abundance of recreational activities. Fishing from the rock jetties, surf casting, canoeing, swimming, nature study, boating, and picnicking will keep the whole family busy. For those interested in South Florida’s underwater beauty, Lloyd Beach has one of the easiest and most interesting shore dives in the area. The park has two boat ramps with easy access to the ocean through the Port Everglades Inlet, which will please those who prefer to fish in open water. The mangrove-lined waterway is a scenic place to canoe, observe bird life, and take photographs. At the Loggerhead Café, visitors can have a leisurely lunch or grab a quick snack. A variety of items are available for rental: canoes, kayaks, paddle boats, sailboats, pontoon boats, gazebos, barbecue grills, and volleyballs. Located north of Hollywood, off A1A.

Jonathan Dickinson State Park
16450 S.E. Federal Highway
Hobe Sound, FL
772-546-2771

Welcome to Jonathan Dickinson State Park
Located just south of Stuart, this park teems with wildlife in 13 natural communities, including sand pine scrub, pine flatwoods, mangroves, and river swamps. The Loxahatchee River, Florida’s first federally designated Wild and Scenic River, runs through the park. Ranger-guided tours of the 1930s pioneer homestead of Trapper Nelson are available year-round. Visitors can enjoy paved and off-road biking, equestrian, and hiking trails. Boating, canoeing, and kayaking along the river are also great ways to see the park. Anglers can catch freshwater fish along the riverbank or from a boat. The park offers two full-facility campgrounds and a youth/group primitive campground. Visitors can arrange boat tours of the river and rent canoes, kayaks, and motorboats by calling (561) 746-1466. Located 12 miles south of Stuart on U.S. 1.

Long Key State Park
P.O. Box 776
Long Key, FL
305-664-4815

Welcome to Long Key State Park
The Spanish named this island “Cayo Vivora” or Rattlesnake Key because its shape resembles a snake with its jaws open. In the early 20th century, Long Key was the site of a luxurious fishing resort that was destroyed during the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935. Today, visitors can explore this island by canoeing through a chain of lagoons or hiking two land-based trails. The Golden Orb Trail leads visitors through five natural communities to an observation tower that provides a panoramic view of the island and its profusion of plant and animal life. Some of the best bone fishing in the Keys is found here. Full-facility campsites overlook the Atlantic Ocean. Located at Mile Marker 67.5, 67400 Overseas Highway.

Oleta River State Park
3400 N.E. 163rd Street North
Miami, FL
305-919-1846

Welcome to Oleta River State Park
Florida’s largest urban park, Oleta River is located on Biscayne Bay in the busy Miami metropolitan area. Although it offers a variety of recreational opportunities, the park is best known for miles of off-road bicycling trails, ranging from novice trails to challenging trails for experienced bicyclists. Along the Oleta River, at the north end of the park, a large stand of beautiful mangrove forest preserves native South Florida plants and wildlife. Canoeists and kayakers can paddle the river to explore this amazing natural area. Swimming from a 1,200-foot sandy beach and saltwater fishing are also popular activities. Picnic tables and grills are available. Nine pavilions can be rented for a fee. All have water, and the largest one has electricity. Visitors can rent kayaks, canoes, and bicycles. The park has a loaner system for bicycle helmets. For overnight visits, the park has rustic, air-conditioned cabins and a youth campground for organized groups. Located at 3400 NE 163rd Street, off I-95 in North Miami.

San Pedro Underwater Archaeological Preserve State Park
P.O. Box 1052
Islamorada, FL
305-664-2540

Welcome to San Pedro Underwater Archaeological Preserve State Park
This underwater archaeological preserve features a submerged shipwreck that is available for diving and snorkeling. Part of a Spanish flotilla, the San Pedro was a 287-ton, Dutch-built ship which sank in a hurricane on July 13, 1733. Her remains were discovered in 1960 in Hawk Channel near Indian Key. After major salvage efforts in the 1960s, all that remains of San Pedro is a large pile of ballast stones covering an area 90 feet long and 30 feet wide. The underwater site has been enhanced with seven replica cannons, an anchor, and an information plaque. Visitors can also appreciate the marine life that occupies the site. Located in 18 feet of water, approximately 1.25 nautical miles south from Indian Key at GPS coordinates 24 degrees 51.802’N, 80 degrees 40.795’W. To prevent anchor damage, please tie up to mooring buoys located at the site.

Savannas Preserve State Park
9551 Gumbo Limbo Lane
Jensen Beach, FL
772-398-2779

Welcome to Savannas Preserve State Park
Freshwater marshes or “savannas” once extended all along Florida’s southeast coast. Stretching more than 10 miles from Ft. Pierce to Jensen Beach, this preserve is the largest and most intact remnant of Florida’s east coast savannas. A good place for visitors to start is the Environmental Education Center where they can learn about the importance of this unique and endangered natural system. Picnic tables are available near the center. Canoeing, kayaking, and fishing in the wetlands are popular activities. Wildlife enthusiasts and photographers can enjoy the diversity of habitats this undisturbed area offers. Over eight miles of multi-use trails provide opportunities for hiking, bicycling, and horseback riding. Guided walks and canoe trips are available by reservation. The Education Center is located in Port St. Lucie, two miles east of U.S. 1 on Walton Road.

St. Lucie Inlet Preserve State Park
4810 S.E. Cove Road
Stuart, FL
772-219-1880

Welcome to St. Lucie Inlet Preserve State Park
This classic Florida barrier island is accessible only by boat, but it is worth the ride. A boardwalk takes visitors across mangrove forests and hammocks of live oaks, cabbage palms, paradise trees, and wild limes to a neatly preserved Atlantic beach. During the summer months, the island is an important nesting area for loggerhead, leatherback, and green turtles. They come ashore at night to dig holes in the beach sand where they lay their eggs. The preserve is a favorite for nature students interested in learning about the native flora and fauna of Florida barrier islands. Visitors come to swim, sunbathe, or picnic at the pavilion on the quiet beach. Others make the trip for the great surf fishing. Snorkeling and scuba diving are also popular activities. Located at Port Salerno, on the Intracoastal Waterway, two thirds of a mile south of the inlet.

The Barnacle Historic State Park
3485 Main Highway
Coconut Grove, FL
305-442-6866

Welcome to The Barnacle Historic
State Park

This beautiful house with a whimsical name dates to a quieter time. The Barnacle, built in 1891, offers a glimpse of Old Florida during The Era of the Bay. Situated on the shore of Biscayne Bay, this was the home of Ralph Middleton Munroe, one of Coconut Groves most charming and influential pioneers. Munroe’s principal passion was designing yachts. In his lifetime, he drew plans for 56 different boats. As a seaman, civic activist, naturalist, and photographer, Commodore Munroe was a man who cherished the natural world around him. A walk into the park passes through a tropical hardwood hammock. In the 1920s, it was representative of the original landscape within the city of Miami. Today, it is one of the last remnants of the once vast Miami Hammock. Enjoy sitting in the rocking chairs on the spacious porch used as a gathering place or on a bench under a tree for solitude.

Windley Key Fossil Reef
Geological State Park

P.O. Box 1052
Islamorada, FL
305-664-2540

Welcome to Windley Key Fossil Reef Geological State Park
Formed of Key Largo limestone, fossilized coral, this land was sold to the Florida East Coast Railroad, which used the stone to build Henry Flagler’s Overseas Railroad in the early 1900s. After the railroad was built, the quarry was used until the 1960s to produce exquisite pieces of decorative stone called Keystone. Today, visitors can walk along eight-foot-high quarry walls to see cross sections of the ancient coral and learn about the quarry and its operation- an important part of Florida’s 20th century history. Samples of the quarry machinery have been preserved at the park. Visitors can enjoy the natural attributes of this island while strolling five short, self-guided trails. Picnic tables are available. The visitor center, open Thursday through Monday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., features educational exhibits about the history of this site. Located at Mile Marker 85.5 on Windley Key near Islamorada.